Conservation

Traveling a thousand kilometers from the coast of Mexico, the National Geographic Pristine Seas team set out to better understand the island’s reefs, unexplored deep waters, and surrounding seamounts. The expedition was part of Pristine Seas, National Geographic’s largest initiative dedicated to environmental preservation, founded by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala in 2008

The expedition was part of Pristine Seas, National Geographic’s largest initiative dedicated to environmental preservation, founded by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala in 2008. Learn more: natgeo.org/pristineseas

Climate change includes both the global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns. Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century the rate of human impact on Earth’s climate system and its global scale have been unprecedented.

Wild places on Earth are under threat like never before from unprecedented human destruction and degradation. The fight to protect these last wild places and secure the future of life on our planet is unfolding now.

National Geographic marine ecologist Enric Sala launched the Pristine Seas project in 2008 to explore and help save the last wild places in the ocean. The goal: Protect 20 percent of the world’s oceans by 2020. These unique ecosystems are a window into the past, revealing what the ocean looked like before overfishing and pollution took their toll. It is essential that we let the world know that these places exist, that they are threatened, and that help is needed to protect them.

The Earth’s wild places are providers and protectors of resources essential to life on this planet, but humans are degrading and destroying these havens on an unprecedented scale. The fight to protect these last wild places and secure the future of life on our planet is unfolding now. The National Geographic Society is teaming up with the Wyss Campaign for Nature to address our current conservation crisis. Our goal: Protect 30% of the planet in its natural state by 2030.

Not all carbon is created equal. Writer Jackson Carpenter argues that the power to stop climate change rests on recognizing different kinds of carbon – a shift in perspective that allows us to change the world without changing our lifestyles. Jackson Carpenter has ten years’ experience working on solutions to climate change and the development of alternative fuels.